All posts tagged: empowerment

Female Empowerment Friday #02

Look who’s back?! This rubric is fun and needed. Noteworthy is that it came to me as Feminist Friday, but I figured that the word feminism scares some people off. So using that word would require a little disclaimer – which I ended up adding to Edition #01 anyway, but without the -ism. I write and speak many disclaimers, really. ‘This is what I do and this is why.’ Interesting. So: Female Empowerment Friday for listed noteworthy infos about fully being female! ♥ Where do you get regular female empowering updates? One awesome source I know is the Thinx newsletter. Thinx provides you with period proof underwear, but their mailings are as noteworthy! They’re actually lined up on their blog page, which does not clog your inbox and is easier to browse. Head over there for mostly short and to the point (read: easy to read), generally quite informative pieces about everything related to being a women! This includes medical information about sexual organs and hormones, anticonception, thought pieces about all kinds of stuff, and many many puns. …

Female Empowerment Friday

I am very passionate about female empowerment. I want all humans to be empowered, and I think that equality both contributes to that and comes as a result of it: empowerment brings equality and equality brings empowerment, ultimately. Because of the many gender-related issues I experience, I cheer of joy every time I find anything that contributes to overcoming these issues. To share the joy, today I list three amazing artists and their art pieces that surely empower women. ♥ Emerging filmmaker Helen Plumb made a wonderful short film about female body hair, in which poet Anam Cara is considering whether or not she should embrace her body hair in public. I find this topic very relevant, since I also experience this tension between my and other females’ natural hairy state and the ‘beauty ideal’ of shaved legs. I love everything about this video: Anam is so real and authentic and I experience much intimacy. Watch the short film here on The Barbican Centre and read the short interview with Helen. Barcelona-based artist and self-called artivist Zinteta makes incredible, …

Connecting through Insecurities

As I was deciding on something important to write about, the What I Be Project popped up. What I Be (WIB) is a project of photographer Steve Rosenfield, for which he takes portraits of persons with their greatest insecurities written on them for everyone to read. Every person thus picture also comes with a statement from their side starting with ‘I am not my’. The pictures and statements are meant to show that these and actually all people have insecurities, but instead of being owned by those, these people are owning them. Steve writes: ‘By stating “I am not my_____,” they are claiming that they do in fact struggle with these issues, but it does not define who they are as a person.’ (…) ‘It is to spread awareness on what people go through due to society’s paved roads. These are serious issues that some of us can live with, but most battle on a day to day basis. Steve started photographing for this project in September 2010 and had since then been capturing insecurities …

Life-long learning with Coursera

You probably know already that there’s a huge amount of free online courses out there. I did too, but I never really looked into it. Then my sister came to advise me to check out this course named How To Change The World on the website of Coursera. I followed her advice, got super enthusiastic, took the course and now I’ve gotten even more enthusiastic about the whole thing! The course How To Change The World was really cool. It’s content formed part of the motivation for me to create this blog. The course was hosted by Wesleyan University in Connecticut, and particularly by the sympathetic Michael S. Roth, whom I really got to love. It contained a lot of useful content and really good, inspirational speakers, including lots of video material from the Social Good Summit of 2014. From the description: ‘This course examines issues concerning poverty, the environment, technology, health care, gender, education and activism to helps us understand better how to initiate positive change.‘ I won’t go into further detail here, but …