All posts tagged: body image

Barbie’s got Curves

In the absence of interesting personal experiences, I’ll just write about Barbie’s. The iconic doll Barbie not only got a large array of accessories, careers, relationships, style, she has also been critiqued widely for her ‘far from average’ body negatively influencing body image and for over all distorting the world view of the little children playing with her. In reaction to declining sales rates, with Disney’s Frozen Elsa and Lego taking over market shares, Mattel gave her designers the freedom to do whatever to make Barbie more relevant. The outcome? In 2015, a larger variety of skin tones and hair textures were added to the mix of blondness. These dolls will all be wearing the name Barbie, instead of having different names and being Barbie’s friends What’s more: Barbie got Curvy! In January 2016 three new body shapes got released: Curvy, Tall and Petite! You can learn more here on TIMES. More interesting is this article on TIMES titled ‘What I learned watching moms and kids meet curvy Barbie’. Apparently, the kids really liked the …

The advantages of wearing soft bras

Earlier I already wrote a bit about body image and self-love and how clothing can play a role in connecting to yourself and others. I believe that if we could value our appearances as less important, we would be able to connect more deeply with ourselves and one another. In my earlier posts I said something about simple clothing, being somehow neutral-looking and comfortable. On this topic, there is one specific thing I’d like to share further. Last fall I attended a Vipassana meditation course. I was just wearing comfortable clothes, all was fine. Until one day during meditation I got enormously aware of how uncomfortably tight my bra was. And really, it wasn’t enormously tight. It had been one of my favourite, best-fitting bras for years. Bras are supposed to be tight, that’s how they behave best. Say what? I got very confused and frustrated. Is this normal? Is this how it feels? I had heard of women disliking wearing bras and being really relieved when being able to take them off after a …

Clothing reconsidered

In my post Love your Body I introduced the topic of body positivity. I wrote something about how I think getting used to being naked or else in simple clothing will be good for your body image and self-love. I then did not specify simple clothing which makes it a very vague statement, but I did mean something with it. Clothing often seems to be really important. I recall that when I had the age of five a group of girls didn’t let me play with them because I was not wearing a dress. Later, I felt regularly as if I wasn’t really wearing the right and nice clothes and as if that made me worth less. I feel as if it took me ages to somewhat find out what I want and don’t want to wear and I just still don’t know really. However, I did find some things. With the ‘simple clothing’ I meant two things. First is that the clothing that you wear as a person is often linked to your ego …

Love your Body

Lately I’ve been thinking a lot about both physical and mental health and taking good care of yourself. One thing that bothers me tremendously is the beauty industry, for they want you to believe you’re ugly, so you’ll buy their products. This quote I heard in a video summing up advices on how to live a happy life: ‘Don’t read beauty magazines. They will only make you feel ugly.’ That one really struck me. It’s so simple, yet it can be hard to see, for avoiding beauty magazines alone is not enough. The beauty industry’s messages are everywhere, they’ve become part of our cultures. Plus, this industry does its utter best to trick you into thinking they’re doing you a favour. Recently, in the UK there has been commotion because of Protein World’s advertisement for it’s weight loss collection. The advertisement shows a female model in bathing clothing with the text ‘Are you beach body ready?’. A petition on Change.org has been set up aiming to get Protein World to remove the posters. The founder …

Connecting through Insecurities

As I was deciding on something important to write about, the What I Be Project popped up. What I Be (WIB) is a project of photographer Steve Rosenfield, for which he takes portraits of persons with their greatest insecurities written on them for everyone to read. Every person thus picture also comes with a statement from their side starting with ‘I am not my’. The pictures and statements are meant to show that these and actually all people have insecurities, but instead of being owned by those, these people are owning them. Steve writes: ‘By stating “I am not my_____,” they are claiming that they do in fact struggle with these issues, but it does not define who they are as a person.’ (…) ‘It is to spread awareness on what people go through due to society’s paved roads. These are serious issues that some of us can live with, but most battle on a day to day basis. Steve started photographing for this project in September 2010 and had since then been capturing insecurities …